Viewing entries tagged
eating

benu : sf, ca - 2012

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benu : sf, ca - 2012

When I heard the Chef de Cuisine of French Laundry, Corey Lee, left to open up his own restaurant in San Francisco, I was really excited. I think we all were; us cooks in the Bay Area, at least.

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minibar - 2013 : the bar

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minibar - 2013 : the bar

While the bar was preparing our drinks, we were served the dessert course, which was an assault on all the senses. Each one consisting of only one or two bites.

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goat lollipops

We saved the tenderloins from a whole goat we purchased from Marin Sun Farms. I had an idea to do goat lollipops. We seared the loin quickly to medium-rare, and then immediately spread it with a very smooth hummus before rolling it into a pangretto of falafel crumbs.

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edible garden

We call the general area of our offices, the Shire. On one of the rooftops, we've installed an urban garden, where we acquire most of our herbs and flowers for Chef's Table. This is the Sous Chef's course. He takes care of it every week, tweaking it a bit this way and that, each time.

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more peas

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more peas

A pea soup and salad combo. Feta cheese, mint, and peas work so well together. This salad is a celebration of their unity.

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peanut butter & jelly

smucker's jar | peanut butter mouse - crumbled peanuts - strawberry sorbet - salted brioche crisp

I don't do desserts often, but this is something simple that I could pull off without pulling my hair out (I don't like working with sweets). It's a playful take on a Smucker's jar, with the salted brioche crisp as the lid. You crack the brioche into the jar with a spoon, and enjoy the textural and temperature juxapositions these familiar ingredients would otherwise provide.

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brioche-crusted halibut & white corn

brioche-crusted halibut | white corn pudding - israeli cous cous - corn shoots

My sous-chef, Cecile, taught me a really cool technique with corn. Basically, you juice raw corn, saving the flesh, pulp, and cob for another purpose. Take that raw corn juice and heat it up, and the starches from the corn will thicken the liquid, making an incredibly intense corn-flavored pudding.

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